University of Liverpool

University of Liverpool

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Introduction

The University of Liverpool was founded as a college in 1881 and is one of the original civic universities. Today it is one of the UK’s leading research institutions with an annual turnover of £480 million, including £102 million for research. Liverpool is ranked in the top 1% of higher education institutions worldwide and is a member of the Russell Group.

Pilkington Liverpool
Royce Facilities

MIF

Royce Facilities

Pilkington
Core Research Area

Chemical Materials Design

The Materials Innovation Factory (MIF) is an innovation village of expertise and knowledge. It draws together world-leading research and technologies and the seamless integration of computations and experimental models. With £10 million worth of measuring and testing instrumentation including the Open Access Area which houses one of the highest-concentration of materials science automation robotics in the world. Furthermore our simple to use scientific data management system (ParaDIME) securely stores the data in a searchable environment; a key requirement for 21st century materials chemistry discovery.

Core Research Area

Combining high-performance computing and materials science, collaborating between academia and industry, will be a game changer for the discovery of new materials and their analysis. The Royce research will have a significant impact on a wide range of industrial sectors, from nanofabrication to nuclear engineering. In the future, it will involve engineers and scientists working together to tailor novel materials to create sustainable structures for the power and transport industries. Royce facilities, which are located in the new Materials Innovation Factory at Liverpool, will feature open access labs which can be used by both academics and industry. Through the use of Computer Aided Materials Science (CAMS) and high-throughput (HT) automation we aim to develop new approaches to materials science, re-thinking potential applications and bringing it into the 21st Century. The potential that new, and at scale, aggregations of automation, control and cognitive computing can offer is limitless. This approach will drive a design revolution for functional materials by enabling designing solutions at the atomic scale.

Chemical Materials
Core Research Area

Chemical Materials Design